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Opening the Black Gate: Revealing Scientific Achievements with Art

March 5, 2014 in Famous People With Dyslexia, News

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Hollywood actress Sardia Robinson’s

February 17, 2014 in Famous People With Dyslexia, News

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Famous People With Dyslexia Laura Kirkpatrick

June 21, 2012 in Famous People With Dyslexia

From Stanford, Kentucky comes Laura, a 19-year-old waitress who aspires to be someone known for working the runway instead of working tables. This 5’6” beauty has dreamed of becoming a model for quite some time, so she took the opportunity to be one when it arrived. She managed to get herself through an arduous audition process where she made her mark, veering away from her love of paintball and dirt bikes. This self-proclaimed tomboy grew up in a dairy farm and is proud of her roots. Laura became known for admitting that she castrated cows, but decided to take on the path leading her to be one of the contestants for America’s Next Top Model’s Cycle 13.

Known as the season for the Shorties, this cycle of the hit series will premiere with its new twist of including models 5’7” or under. Fourteen girls will compete for the grand prize of a modeling contract, as well as holding the title of being 
America’s Next Top Model. They will soon be going through several challenges that will test their skills, enabling them to prove themselves and fulfill their dreams. The 14 will go fierce and fabulous as they learn to master complicated catwalks, undergo intense physical fitness, take part in fashion photo shoots and perfect their publicity skills.



Laura Kirkpatrick: Dealing with Dyslexia



I see in one of the comments someone asked if I was dyslexic. Yes I am very much so. I struggled so much in school and I took a lot of abuse because of it. I had to learn on my own how to deal with it. It seemed there was absolutely no one in the school system that teaches dyslexic students what it is or how to deal with it. I hope someday I can bring attention to this problem. I want to become very active in helping the dyslexic problem go away. It caused me a lot of pain in school. I often felt dumb or embarrassed and I would get physical sick just thinking about going to school. I was too embarrassed until now to speak up about being dyslexic but now I want to fight against it. I don’t want other students to have to go through what I had to. For those who don’t know what it is… Dyslexia is a learning disability where there is a gap in the brain. It makes it near impossible to remember patterns. Dyslexic people can’t hear the phonological sound of letters. Black and white text can make us sick to look at, since it may look like it’s moving, switched around, missingect. Every dyslexic person is different though so it’s hard to find the right way to help. I could go on all day about it but I’ll stop there for now.
Love, Laura

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Holly Willoughby: I’m dyslexic

June 20, 2012 in Famous People With Dyslexia

This Morning host has trouble spelling words Holly Willoughby has revealed she has dyslexia. The This Morning host, 28, made the admission after fans mocked her spelling on Twitter.  ‘Thank you for flagging up my spelling,’ she wrote. ‘I am dyslexic, and don’t have time to spell check everything, you may just have to overlook it.’ Holly’s post read: ‘Morning, today we’re talking, teenage peregnancies!’How to be famouse’ with Pete Waterman and Sara Payne is talking about victim support. x’

Holly Marie Willoughby (born 10 February 1981 in Brighton) is an English television presenter, known for her work in presenting children’s TV and entertainment shows. In 2006, she won a BAFTA and was chosen to present Dancing on Ice, a highly popular UK celebrity talent show, shown on ITV which drew in an average of 8.9m million viewers in the most recently concluded series. In July 2009 she was selected as a replacement for Fern Britton on This Morning.

Holly began presenting on This Morning on Monday, 14 September 2009, alongside BBC veteran Phillip Schofield

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Dyslexic Architect

June 15, 2012 in Famous People With Dyslexia

Hugh Newell Jacobson Architect


The work of Hugh Newell Jacobsen-one of America’s most acclaimed architects-is infused with a rare sense of clarity and elegance. He is best known for his modern pavilion-based residences-compositions of simple, gabled forms that are rectangular in plan. Unlike other second-generation modernist architects who revisited the iconic European houses of the 1920s or the American shingle style of the nineteenth century, Jacobsen drew inspiration from the vernacular architecture of the American homestead. His grand yet intimately scaled pavilions recall the barns, detached kitchens, and smokehouses-the outbuildings-of rural America.  Jacobsen has won more than 110 awards for design excellence during his 40-year career.

Born in Grand Rapids, Michigan, in 1929, Jacobsen earned a Bachelor’s degree from the University of Maryland in 1951 and a Master’s degree in architecture from Yale University in 1955. Prior to attending Yale, Jacobsen was a portrait painter working in a variety of media. This work in figurative painting may explain why Jacobsen, though trained as a modernist and influenced by the work of Louis I. Kahn and Philip Johnson, maintained an affinity for picturesque compositions and traditional building forms.

When Jacobsen opened his own office in Washington, D.C., in 1958, most of his early commissions were flat-roofed modern houses. But by the early 1960s he began to look beyond the vocabulary of mainstream modern architecture to explore the roof plane as a sculptural element. The roof of his Beech House (1963) comprises a series of pyramidal forms that define the house’s distinct spaces, from the public living and dining areas to the more private bedrooms. Jacobsen had replaced the traditional single, large roof with multiple, smaller roofs-articulated shapes that break down the apparent scale of the house.

Jacobsen continued to refine his vocabulary of building shapes and materials in the late 1960s and early 1970s. It was not until 1974, with the Blumenthal House, however, that he began to create his characteristic gabled pavilions-a compositional device that is still his signature building form. Through projects such as the Buckwalter House (1982), a series of pavilions that telescope from large to small, Jacobsen uniquely combined elements of traditional and modern architecture. The main facade recalls a colonial farmhouse, but the mirrored-glass sides, steel-reinforced balloon frame, and open, light-filled interior are clearly modern.


Jacobsen has also designed a number of large-scale, commercial and institutional structures such as the library for the American University in Cairo, Egypt (1981), and the University of Michigan Alumni Center in Ann Arbor (1982). And while he has continued to refine his characteristic vocabulary in the design of new structures, he has also been an active preservationist. His addition to the United States Capitol (1993), as well as his renovations of The Renwick Gallery (1972), the American embassies in Paris (1984) and Moscow (1984), and private residences, demonstrate his ability to transform a building while respecting its historic fabric. Jacobsen has made his most important mark, however, in the realm of freestanding houses. Many architects have experimented with the idea of the modern home in the second half of the twentieth century, but few have composed as eloquent an essay as Hugh Newell Jacobsen.

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Have you noticed a change since the last time you’ve visited? We’re growing! And, we need your support! The development and managment of this site takes money. If you support our goals, consider supporting our growth. donate

Thank you Leon Lewis Jr.