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NINDS Dyslexia Information Page

October 9, 2011 in Resources

 


What is Dyslexia?

Dyslexia is a brain-based type of learning disability that specifically impairs a person’s ability to read. These individuals typically read at levels significantly lower than expected despite having normal intelligence. Although the disorder varies from person to person, common characteristics among people with dyslexia are difficulty with spelling, phonological processing (the manipulation of sounds), and/or rapid visual-verbal responding. In adults, dyslexia usually occurs after a brain injury or in the context of dementia. It can also be inherited in some families, and recent studies have identified a number of genes that may predispose an individual to developing dyslexia.

Is there any treatment?

The main focus of treatment should be on the specific learning problems of affected individuals. The usual course is to modify teaching methods and the educational environment to meet the specific needs of the individual with dyslexia.

What is the prognosis?

For those with dyslexia, the prognosis is mixed. The disability affects such a wide range of people and produces such different symptoms and varying degrees of severity that predictions are hard to make. The prognosis is generally good, however, for individuals whose dyslexia is identified early, who have supportive family and friends and a strong self-image, and who are involved in a proper remediation program.


What research is being done?

The National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) and other institutes of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) support dyslexia research through grants to major medical institutions across the country. Current research avenues focus on developing techniques to diagnose and treat dyslexia and other learning disabilities, increasing the understanding of the biological basis of learning disabilities, and exploring the relationship between neurophysiological processes and cognitive functions with regard to reading ability.

NIH Patient Recruitment for Dyslexia Clinical Trials

Organizations

International Dyslexia Association
40 York Road
4th Floor
Baltimore,
MD
21204
info@interdys.org
http://www.interdys.org/

Tel: 410-296-0232
800-ABCD123

Fax: 410-321-5069

Learning Disabilities Association of America
4156 Library Road
Suite 1
Pittsburgh,
PA
15234-1349
info@ldaamerica.org
http://www.ldaamerica.org/

Tel: 412-341-1515

Fax: 412-344-0224

National Center for Learning Disabilities
381 Park Avenue South
Suite 1401
New York,
NY
10016
http://www.ld.org/

Tel: 212-545-7510
888-575-7373

Fax: 212-545-9665

National Institute of Child Health and Human
Development (NICHD)

National Institutes of Health, DHHS
31 Center Drive, Rm. 2A32 MSC 2425
Bethesda,
MD
20892-2425
http://www.nichd.nih.gov/

Tel: 301-496-5133

Fax: 301-496-7101

National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH)
National Institutes of Health, DHHS
6001 Executive Blvd. Rm. 8184, MSC 9663
Bethesda,
MD
20892-9663
nimhinfo@nih.gov
http://www.nimh.nih.gov/

Tel: 301-443-4513/866-415-8051
301-443-8431 (TTY)

Fax: 301-443-4279

Related NINDS Publications and Information

Prepared by:

Office of Communications and Public Liaison

National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke

National Institutes of Health

Bethesda, MD 20892

NINDS health-related material is provided for information purposes only and does not necessarily represent endorsement by or an official position of the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke or any other Federal agency. Advice on the treatment or care of an individual patient should be obtained through consultation with a physician who has examined that patient or is familiar with that patient’s medical history.
All NINDS-prepared information is in the public domain and may be freely copied. Credit to the NINDS or the NIH is appreciated.

Last updated March 12, 2009

The National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) and other institutes of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) support dyslexia research through grants to major medical institutions across the country. Current research avenues focus on developing techniques to diagnose and treat dyslexia and other learning disabilities, increasing the understanding of the biological basis of learning disabilities, and exploring the relationship between neurophysiological processes and cognitive functions with regard to reading ability.

For those with dyslexia, the prognosis is mixed. The disability affects such a wide range of people and produces such different symptoms and varying degrees of severity that predictions are hard to make. The prognosis is generally good, however, for individuals whose dyslexia is identified early, who have supportive family and friends and a strong self-image, and who are involved in a proper remediation program.

The main focus of treatment should be on the specific learning problems of affected individuals. The usual course is to modify teaching methods and the educational environment to meet the specific needs of the individual with dyslexia.

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Dyslexia Organizations

October 7, 2011 in Resources

International Dyslexia Association 
40 York Road 4th Floor
Baltimore, MD 21204
info@interdys.org
http://www.interdys.org
Tel: 410-296-0232 800-ABCD123
Fax: 410-321-5069


Learning Disabilities Association of America
4156 Library Road Suite 1
Pittsburgh, PA 15234-1349
info@ldaamerica.org
http://www.ldaamerica.org
Tel: 412-341-1515
Fax: 412-344-0224


National Center for Learning Disabilities
381 Park Avenue South Suite 1401
New York, NY 10016
http://www.ld.org
Tel: 212-545-7510 888-575-7373
Fax: 212-545-9665


National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD)
National Institutes of Health, DHHS
31 Center Drive, Rm. 2A32 MSC 2425 Bethesda, MD 20892-2425
http://www.nichd.nih.gov
Tel: 301-496-5133
Fax: 301-496-7101


National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH)
National Institutes of Health, DHHS
6001 Executive Blvd. Rm. 8184, MSC 9663 Bethesda, MD 20892-9663
nimhinfo@nih.gov
http://www.nimh.nih.gov
Tel: 301-443-4513/866-415-8051 301-443-8431 (TTY)
Fax: 301-443-4279

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70 Excellent Links for Dyslexia Support

February 15, 2011 in Resources

70 Excellent Links for Dyslexia Support

Turn to these communities for dyslexia assistance and support.

1. Dyslexia Support Group: Find a helping hand in these dyslexia support groups.

2. DailyStrength: DailyStrength offers a dyslexia support group.

3. Council for Exceptional Children: The Council for Exceptional Children offers a voice and vision for special education.

4. Dyslexia Walk: Get involved in the cause of dyslexia by participating in the Dyslexia Walk.

5. Learning Disabilities Association of America: The LDA offers information, resources, and support for learning disabilities.

6. The International Dyslexia Association: The Interdys promotes literacy through research, education, and advocacy.

7. Council for Learning Disabilities: The CLD discusses issues related to students with learning disabilities.

8. Head Strong: Head Strong offers a forum to empower the dyslexic community.

9. Being Dyslexic: These forums offer information and support for teenagers, adults, teachers, parents, and experts alike.

10. Dislecksic Support: Find answers for dyslexia on Dislecksic Support.

11. DyslexiaSupport: Check out the DyslexiaSupport Yahoo! Group to share ideas and exchange help.

12. Dyslexic Advantage: Dyslexic Advantage is dedicated to fostering the gifts of people with dyslexia.

Dyslexia Awareness & Information

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The Dyslexia Center

November 9, 2010 in Resources

Vision
A community where those with dyslexia are able to reach their full potential, thereby benefiting themselves and the community at large; a nationally recognized and accredited center for professional development in Colorado Springs.
Mission
To improve the literacy skills of children at risk for reading failure through research-based instruction in reading, both directly at our Center and through the teachers we train in the community.
Goals
  • To offer assessment and intervention to children and adults with learning disabilities.
  • To promote training in effective reading instruction through quality programs and to deliver those programs with integrity.
  • To develop public awareness and build community support of research-based reading instruction and its critical role.
  • To promote Colorado Springs as a center for professional development in dyslexia remediation and reading instruction.
Services 
The Dyslexia Center provides the following services to children and parents, educators and the community. Please read the testimonials provided by those who have particpated in our services.
The Dyslexia Center provides comprehensive psycho-educational evaluations as well as reading assessments. The diagnostic evaluation identifies possible learning disabilities, including dyslexia, while analyzing individual strengths and weaknesses. If you or your child is struggling with reading and writing a quality assessment is important for three reasons:
1.   Diagnosis
2.   Intervention Planning
3.   Documentation
Remediation consists of intense and direct instruction in a research-based, multi-sensory curriculum with phonemic awareness, phonics, fluency, vocabulary and comprehension components. All instruction is provided by a Certified Academic Language Therapist (CALT) or Practitioner (CALP).
Under the direction of high quality professionals, The Dyslexia Center is a leading resource in reading instruction. Individuals may sit for certification exams upon completion of specific programs aligned with the rigorous standards of the International Multisensory Structured Language Education Council (IMSLEC) and the Academic Laguage Therapy Association (ALTA). Customized in-service trainings are available.
The Dyslexia Center offers presentations to interested groups, including parents, teachers, administrators and physicians. Presentations include programs on reading acquisition, dyslexia and related learning disabilities.
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The Yale Center for Dyslexia & Creativity

December 21, 2009 in Resources


“We know more about dyslexia than we do about cancer.
We know how to identify it correctly, and intervene at an early age.
We can’t say that about many other medical conditions.”
-Dr. Bennett Shaywitz

The Yale Center for Dyslexia & Creativity serves as a nexus for research on dyslexia, and is as well a leading source of advocacy and information to better the lives of people with dyslexia.
Our mission is to uncover and illuminate the strengths of those with dyslexia, disseminate the latest innovations from scientific research and practical advice, and transform the treatment of children and adults with dyslexia.

Many of today’s leading innovators from a variety of fields—business, medicine, film, design, and even writing—are dyslexic.  Most rose to their positions not by accident, but by a careful navigation of barriers.
With the Center’s emphasis on strengths rather than failures, children—and adults—can become some of society’s most creative and valued contributors.

Dyslexia is often spoken of as a hidden disability. What is not at all appreciated is that dyslexia can be also a hidden source of great abilities and frequently unrecognized powers.
The YCDC Website is a valuable tool to…
  • Deliver news and information about the center and about research on dyslexia.

  • Provide resources, information, and encouragement to people with dyslexia, parents, educators, and clinicians.
  • Highlight the strengths of individuals with dyslexia.